King Power Stadium

By Football Tripper

Last Updated: October 19, 2015

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Aerial View of King Power Stadium

Stadium Overview

Team: Leicester City

Address: Filbert Way, Leicester, Leicestershire, LE2 7FL

Capacity: 32,262

Opened: 2002

King Power Stadium or Filbert Way as it is often referred to by fans is the home stadium of English football club Leicester City. Opened in 2002 as Walkers Stadium by former player and brand ambassador of the crisp manufacturer Gary Lineker, the ground has a capacity of 32,262.

Stadium Guide

History

Leicester City’s decision to relocate to a new stadium at the turn of the millennium was an indirect result of the Taylor Report which was published in 1990 after the tragic events of Hillsborough. The club’s previous ground, Filbert Street, had been home to the club since 1891 but was expensive to redevelop further beyond conversion to all-seating in 1994.

Following the lead set by Midlands rivals Stoke City and Derby County who successfully moved to newly constructed grounds, the club unveiled plans for a 32,000 capacity stadium at Freeman’s Wharf on the 2nd November 2000. Construction work began a year later, and it was completed in time for the 2002-2003 season with pre-season friendlies held against Real Madrid and Athletic Bilbao.

At the time the move to the “Walkers Stadium” appeared to be a risky decision for the club having just been relegated from the Premier League. The construction plunged the club into £30 million pounds worth of debt, and financial concerns were exacerbated by the collapse of ITV Digital who had purchased the broadcast rights to the Football League.

The company who built the “Crisp Bowl”, Birse Construction, reportedly lost a lot money from the project, and as a result were forced to withdraw from future stadium constructions, abandoning a project they were working on at the time with Coventry City.

Today, the circumstances surrounding the Foxes are much more positive, with the club acquired by Billionaire Thai Vichai Raksriaksorn in 2010. Since the 2011/2012 season, the ground has been known as The King Power Stadium, who are one of the owner’s many companies.

Seating Plan

Below is a seating plan for Leicester City’s King power Stadium:

king-power-stadium-leicester-city-seating-plan

Stands

Leicester City’s Stadium is made up of four parts: Marks Electrical Family Stand (North), The Air Asia Stand (East), The Spion Kop (South) and Upton Steel Stand (West).

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Click the thumbnails above to enlarge an image of each stand and to read a more detailed description of each part of the stadium.

The Matchday Experience

Away Fans

Travelling supporters who make the East-Midlands trip to see their side take on Leicester watch the game from the north-east corner of the stadium. The standard allocation of 3,000 tickets ensures that this little single-tiered pocket of the King Power Stadium is nicely filled, and fans can amass in a large enough number to make some noise.

The raised roof helps to amplify the acoustics once inside, and when both sets of fans get going, the ground can have a really decent atmosphere. Seats are comfortable with plenty of leg-room, although the gentle incline of the stands does reduce the sense of intimacy somewhat.

The concourses are more than adequate with enough space to ensure away fans can enjoy a relatively peaceful pint and plenty of television screens.  Reports from away fans are generally favorable when it comes to the stewarding however, many suggest that the police presence is excessive. Particularly when these Foxes haven’t got a reputation for violence.

Best Pubs

One of the most popular options for both sets of fans is the Soaring Eagle Spur Steak & Grill which is housed within the Holiday Inn Express literally 1 minute north-west of the stadium. Although a chain, it has a decent selection of food and drink, and often a decent atmosphere on matchdays.

Slightly further away 10 minutes east there is The Local Hero Flaming Grill, and The Counting House pub which has Sky Sports on inside.

Despite being close to the away end, The Symphony Rooms is often off-limits for travelling fans, as is the F-Bar which is located just past Filbert Street and popular with older Foxes Fans.

Food

Within the city centre there are more restaurants and franchises than I care to type, with everything one would typically expect to find within a mid-sized city such as Leicester. In terms of proximity to the ground, there is a Morrisons and Nandos east of the ground on Freemans Common Road.

Club Shop

Leicester City operate a Megastore at King Power Stadium in addition to their own official online store: http://www.lcfcdirect.com/. The opening times for the club shop are as follows:

  • Monday to Saturday: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm
  • Sunday: 10.00 am – 2.00pm
  • Matchdays: 9:00 am until 45 minutes after the full time whistle.
leicester-city-fc

The Leicester City club store sells more than just crisps these days.

Stadium Tours

Guided tours of the facilities at King Power Stadium have now returned in time for the 2015/2016 season.

Costing £10.00 for adults, and £5.00 for children, tours generally run four times a month, and can be booked by visiting the City Fan store, phoning the office on 0344 815 5000 (option 1), or visiting LCFC Direct.

For more information and the latest schedule of stadium tours please visit this page.

Ticket Information

Premier League ticket prices are listed below, however it is difficult to give comprehensive prices as they are adjusted on a match by match basis, and depending on where you sit inside the stadium.

Category A: e.g Chelsea, Man Utd, Arsenal

  • Adults: £30.00 to £50.00
  • Seniors: £29.00 to £44.00
  • Under 22s: £29.00 to £44.00
  • Under 18s: £19.00 to £34.00
  • Under 12s: £7.00 to £15.00
  • Under 10s: £5.00 to £12.00

Category B: e.g Hull City, West Brom, Watford

  • Adults: £26.00 to £48.00
  • Seniors: £24.00 to £42.00
  • Under 22s: £24.00 to £42.00
  • Under 18s: £18.00 to £34.00
  • Under 12s: £5.00 to £15.00
  • Under 10s: £0 to £12.00

Matchday Travel

The King Power Stadium is located on the eastern bank of the River Soar just under 1.4 miles from Leicester city centre. The average Football Tripper can walk to in just under 20 minutes.

The exterior of the King Power Stadium with the City fanstore below.

The exterior of the King Power Stadium with the City fanstore below.

Driving

King Power stadium’s address for satnav is as follows:

  • Filbert Way, Leicester, LE2 7FL.

Car Parks

The car-park at the stadium is available to home fans on matchdays at a cost of £15.00 per space with no spaces allocated to the visiting supporters. You can reserve a parking space by getting a ticket by phoning the the club on 0844 815 5000 (option 1) or visiting the Foxes store at the stadium before the day of the match.

There is also parking available at the Freemans Common Business Park which are run on a charitable basis with the £4.00 parking fee going to the Multiple Sclerosis Therapy Centre.

Train

King Power Stadium is located approximately 1.4 miles south-west of Leicester Railway station with the resulting walk likely to take anywhere between 20-25 minutes.

The exterior of Leicester train station

With most people having internet/GPS on their phones these days there’s not much point in listing comprehensive directions!

Bus

The nearest bus stops to the stadium appear to be on Aylestone Road (A426) with the one outside Freemen’s Common probably your best bet.

Leicester’s stadium is served by several bus routes including the 47 and the 47a plus the 85, 86 and 87.

Hotels

Towards the north-west of the ground there is a conveniently located Holiday Inn Express which is literally a stones throw from the pitch.

Back towards the centre of Leicester the Premier Inn and the Ibis are the two hotels closest to the railway station with The Travelodge another decent, centrally located choice.


By Football Tripper

Last Updated: October 19, 2015

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